African states and The Hague Code of Conduct against Ballistic Missile Proliferation

2021-06-30

Four of the five most recent subscribing states to The Hague Code of Conduct against Ballistic Missile Proliferation (HCoC) are African. Adopted in November 2002 in The Hague, the HCoC’s chief objective is to curb the proliferation of ballistic missiles capable of delivering nuclear, chemical or biological weapons, as well as related technology. When fully implemented, the HCoC holds significant security and socio-economic benefits, and is thus of crucial importance given Africa’s developmental context and imperatives. 


About the author

Gugu Dube, at the time of writing, was a researcher in the ENACT transnational organised crime programme at the ISS. She was a consultant to the 2013 UN Group of Governmental Experts for the UN Register of Conventional Arms.

Lauriane Héau is the Foundation for Strategic Research’s (FRS) European projects manager. She previously worked as a research assistant at the Clingendael Institute, and for the Group for Research and Information on Peace and Security.

Emmanuelle Maitre is a research fellow at the FRS. Previously, she worked as a research assistant at the Brookings Institution. She has an MA in public affairs from Sciences Po in Paris.

Noel Stott is a Senior Researcher at the Verification Research, Training and Information Centre (VERTIC) based in London. From May 2002 to November 2016, Noel was employed by the ISS.


Image: Amelia Broodryk/ISS, adapted from Army Recognition

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