Violent extremism in Kenya: Why women are a priority

2017-11-08

This study seeks to understand how women in Kenya are involved in violent extremism and in efforts to prevent and counter it. It also explores how women are affected by and respond to extremism. The findings show the multifaceted impact of violent extremism on women and their communities. There is also a complex set of dynamics that influence how women become actively involved as perpetrators or, more commonly, as supporters and facilitators of violent extremism. The study shows that more must be done to include women in programmes that aim to prevent and counter violent extremism in Kenya.

About the authors

Irene Ndung’u is a researcher at the ISS. She has a Master’s degree in international relations from the University of the Witwatersrand, South Africa.

Uyo Salifu is a researcher at the ISS. She has a Master’s degree in international relations from the University of Pretoria, South Africa.

Romi Sigsworth is a consultant at the ISS. She has Masters degree in Women’s Studies from Oxford University, United Kingdom.

Picture: Jeannie O’Brien/Trócaire

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